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Part 2

Matt Crowe’s Blog

Method 2 of 3: Succeeding Academically

  1. Become an Astronaut Step 2.jpg
    1

    Get excellent grades in high school. Get excellent grades in every subject. All of them. Every single one. Astronauts are a smart breed. Math and science are most important, but English, history, and foreign relations have their places, too. It’s best to be as well-rounded as possible. Not only for you, but also because the competition will be fierce. You’ll be going up against the cream of the crop.

    • Alright, so you don’t have the power to stop time. Since you’re not a machine, concentrate on math and science — you’ll be dealing with those for at least the next decade of your career training.
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    Be a stellar student at a good university. A bachelor’s degree in math, physics, engineering, or science from a reputable (accredited) school is required. Don’t get distracted by college social life — your grades should be your number one concern.

    • Look into the ROTC programs, especially those of the Air Force and Navy at your college of choice. Your ultimate goal in the military is to be a test pilot, because they have the most experience flying experimental aircraft.
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    Complete ≥ 3 years of experience work. This can be in the form of professional experience or in the form of a degree. Should you choose to get a degree, know that a master’s counts as 1 year of experience and a PhD as 3, regardless of how long it takes you to complete these degrees.

    • If you have experience in piloting, you must complete at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft. Be sure you also have flight test experience.
    • Should you choose to simply get professional experience, get a job related to something an astronaut would have to do. Examples include navigation, piloting, working with computers, chemistry/biology, or commanding a ship. You should also note that teaching is an important part of being an astronaut, and thus teachers (both college and K-12) are encouraged to apply. [6]

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How to Become an Astronaut Part 1

Matt Crowe’s Blog

Method 1 of 3: Making the Initial Cut

1. Be a citizen of a country with a space agency that is capable of sending humans to space.  Russia, China, and the USA are the front runners.

2. Be the right age.  The ESA is seeking candidates who are between 27 and 37 years old.  NASA is less stringent; there are no known age restrictions, but the past astronauts are between the ages of 26 and 46. The average age is 34.

3. Be the right height. The ESA only accepts candidates who are between 5′ to 6’2 1/2″.  With NASA, they seek men and women between 5’2″ and 6’3″.

4.  Pass the physical. In order to become an astronaut, your near and far vision must be correctable to 20/20.  As for your health, your blood pressure cannot be above 140/90 when in a sitting position.

5. Speak English.

6. Learn how to swim and swim well. Because of gravity, day-to-day air living isn’t great for simulating the universe. Some of your training will be done underwater.

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NASA Announces New Opportunities for Public Participation in Asteroid Grand Challenge

Matt Crowe’s Blog

Ten new projects are providing opportunities for the public to participate in NASA’s Asteroid Grand Challenge, which accelerates the agency’s asteroid initiative work through innovative partnerships and collaborations. …read more

Source:: Breaking Nasa News

      

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NASA Announces New Opportunities for Public Participation in Asteroid Grand Challenge

Matt Crowe’s Blog

Ten new projects are providing opportunities for the public to participate in NASA’s Asteroid Grand Challenge, which accelerates the agency’s asteroid initiative work through innovative partnerships and collaborations. …read more

Source:: Breaking Nasa News

      

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NASA Selects Student Teams for High-Powered Rocket Challenge

Matt Crowe’s Blog

NASA has selected eight teams from middle and high schools across the country to participate in the 2014-2015 NASA Student Launch Challenge, April 7-12, organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. …read more

Source:: Breaking Nasa News

      

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NASA Teams with South Korean Agency to Further Improve Air Traffic Management

Matt Crowe’s Blog

NASA and the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) have signed a memorandum of understanding for future cooperation on the development of advanced air traffic management technologies, benefiting airline passengers and citizens of both nations. …read more

Source:: Breaking Nasa News

      

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